February 27, 2024
Herbert C Brown

Herbert C Brown: Known for Organoboranes

Herbert C Brown is known as Herbert Charles Brown , or H.C. Brown, one of the most prolific writers of American fiction, writing more than fifty novels during his lifetime and winning two major awards from the United States Government for his contributions to science-fiction literature. He was born in 1869 in Cincinnati, Ohio and died in 1947 at the age of eighty-four years old. Herbert C Brown is known for writing about technology and scientific advancements in a way that we can only describe as futuristic.

About Herbert C Brown

Herbert C Brown attended public schools and later graduated from the Columbia University School of Journalism in 1893. He then worked as a newspaper reporter and followed this up with a job at the Chicago Times. Herbert C Brown enlisted in the United States Army during World War I and was stationed at Fort Knox, Kentucky where he had many contacts within the American military machine. After World War I he became an editor for Scientific American magazine and also published his own literary magazine called The Rainbow. In 1925 he was awarded for two novels published during his lifetime that were about scientific advances.

Life of Charles Brown

His Birth

Herbert C Brown was born in London in the year 1912. After a few years he moved to New York and then finally Chicago. He married Sarah Baylen and they had three children. He had many jobs while he raised his family which included working as a journalist at the Chicago Times, and being a public relations officer for General Electric, an editor for Scientific American , and a writer of science fiction books.

His education

Herbert C Brown was intelligent and was able to graduate from Columbia University at the age of twenty-one with a degree in journalism. He worked as a journalist as well as a public relations officer and editor for General Electric. He also wrote science fiction books, which were set in the future, mainly in the twentieth century.

Herbert C Brown used his education from Columbia University to work as an editor for Scientific American magazine. In 1925 he was awarded for two novels that he published during his lifetime that were about scientific advances.

His personal life

Herbert C. Brown marry to Sarah Baylen and they had three children. He lived from 1912 to 2004 and died at the age of eighty-four years old in Michigan.

Herbert C Brown wrote fifty novels during his lifetime and also wrote about science fiction as well as futuristic events. He used his real knowledge of science and technology to write these books. In 1925 he was award for two novels that he published during his lifetime that were about scientific advances.

Career

His Researches

Herbert C Brown

The reactions of diborane

Diborane is a compound which was never broke down into smaller molecules in the laboratory. Herbert C Brown won two important awards for his research on diborane which included being award the American Institute of Physics Fellowship, and the Daniel Guggenheim Fellowship.

Schlesinger’s laboratory

He discovered that boron reacts with hydrogen and chlorine to form diborane. He also discovered that boron is a non-metal and forms compounds with hydrogen, chlorine, fluorine and oxygen.

Herbert C Brown undertook his research after graduating from Columbia University in the year 1892. His research was important because he was able to explore the properties of diborane in detail. The research information was detail and it allowed other scientists to be able to develop more about diborane.

Low molecular weight uranium compounds

He worked with Chang Tien-Yeh and T. Young on the low molecular weight uranium compounds. This was of benefit to the US atomic bomb development program during World War II .

Herbert C Brown’s research has continued up until the present day, because of his thorough research in the laboratory, he was able to develop a better understanding of trichlorobenzene in 1925. After being award two novels by the United States Congress and two awards by the American Institute of Physics. His work has help a lot of people in their further studies as well as improved our understanding and usage of diborane today.

Organoboranes

His investigations into organoboranes ( organo-boron compounds) resulted in him winning the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1970, with Sir John Warcup Cornforth and Sir James Dewar.

Herbert C Brown was able to work with other scientists to try and understand the use of organoboranes, which are molecular compounds of boron, carbon and hydrogen. He was able to establish that they have individual properties and characteristics, as well as being important for our knowledge about these chemical compounds. His research also helped us develop a better understanding about organoboranes today, as well as their future usage for us.

Awards and Honor

Herbert C Brown received the Mellon Foundation Fellowship in the year 1937. He was one of the first three American scientists working in the field of chemistry to receive this award. The Mellon Foundation Fellowship included a cash prize, research fund, and book allowance.

Herbert C Brown was award two novels by the United States Congress, and two awards by the American Institute of Physics which included a Daniel Guggenheim Fellowship Award as well as an AIP Medal for Chemistry.

He get nobel prize in chemistry in the year 1979, with Georg Wittig. He was award by the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Medal for Chemistry in 1962.

Herbert C Brown received an award from the American Institute of Physics as a Daniel Guggenheim Fellowship award in 1935. The previous winners of this award were Richard Feynman and Henry Eyring, both later became Nobel laureates for their work on quantum mechanics.

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